Posted on

Preparing for Inktober 2018!

This week I made quite a daunting decision to participate in Inktober for the first time ever.

For those of you who don’t know, Inktober is an art challenge that happens during the month of October, where you have to do one drawing a day for the entire month. Given the name the main medium to use is of course ink in some shape or form, whether digital or traditional, but you can incorporate other mediums into the piece too.  It’s something I’ve always wanted to do since it first started back in my DeviantArt days a long, long time ago, but somehow I’ve just never had the time for it.

I’m going to be using a Stillman & Birn Beta Series 270gsm cold pressed watercolour sketchbook for the challenge. It’s my first time using this brand and I’m already really excited about it, good watercolour sketchbooks are hard to come by and the paper is so lovely and thick.  All the main materials I’m using this year are linked at the bottom of this post.

My goal for participating this year is not improving my drawing skills- I mean improving would be nice and all – but my personal goal this year is consistency. I’ve struggled for a long time now with drawing and posting YouTube videos on a regular and consistent basis. It’s partly to do with my health issues – I have chronic pain which can be very exhausting, and I work in a day job where I’m on my feet all day. Most of the days I’m not in work I spend recovering. But it’s also because I’m not a very organised person and I find it tricky to stick to deadlines.

I’ll be uploading on a daily basis to my YouTube channel for the whole month. I’m hoping that Inktober and its very tight schedule, plus the accountability of you guys watching, will get me in the habit of editing, doing voice-overs and uploading on a regular basis.  I’ve got a lot of goals for the channel going forward which I really want to stick to, so I’m hoping that Inktober will give me the motivation and routine that I need in order to do this. I want to teach myself self-discipline and prove to myself that it is possible to set aside time to draw and and work on content every day regardless of what I’m doing.

insta promo

This year, I plan on using the official 2018 prompts, but with a twist! All of the drawings that I’ll be doing from these prompts are going to be animal related somehow.  There are quite a few tricky prompts on this list which I’m a little bit nervous about but I am up for the challenge and super excited to see what I can come up with that somehow relates to some of these more difficult prompts.

The best part about Inktober is that we’re all in this together and the community and artwork shared during this time of the year is so awesome and motivating. So if you are joining me in participating in Inktober this year, good luck, and stay determined! I believe in us! Even if you’re not participating, I hope that this inspires you to pick up a pen and get sketching. I would love to see what you come up with for each day as well, so please do tag me in your inktober posts over on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook too!

My Recommended Inktober Art Supplies (sponsored Amazon Links):

Pentel brush pen
US: https://amzn.to/2xVpwNZ
UK: https://amzn.to/2xHzZNL

Size 2 squirrel brush
US: https://amzn.to/2zzRJM8
UK: https://amzn.to/2xHazQ3

Indian Ink
US: https://amzn.to/2QejIGL
UK: https://amzn.to/2N6Dh1Y

Stillman & Birn Beta series 5.5 x 8.5 inch hardbound sketchbook
US: https://amzn.to/2OgwIyd
UK: https://amzn.to/2xEH01G

Uni Posca Ultra Fine Paint Markers
US: https://amzn.to/2Ikhv9W
UK: https://amzn.to/2N7Hbaz

Uniball Pin Fine Liners
US: https://amzn.to/2CTolEu
UK: https://amzn.to/2xaX1MN

That’s it from me for now, I hope to see you over on my Youtube channel for Day 1 of the Inktober challenge!

Posted on

4 More Tips for Beginner Coloured Pencil Artists!

The next installment of my new coloured pencil tips series is out! If you are hard of hearing or prefer to read I have also included the transcript for this video below. It’s something I’d like to do more often in my videos but it can be pretty time consuming. I’ll try to do it when and where I can. I hope you find these tips helpful!

4 More Beginner Tips for Coloured Pencil Artists

 

Hi everyone, Wild Portrait Artist here! A while ago I did a video on four beginner tips for coloured pencil artists. This time around I’ll be bringing you 4 more tips, but be sure to check out the previous video if you haven’t already. Let’s get started!

Tip #1: Start with an accurate rough sketch

 

Without an accurate sketch, no matter how skilled you are with coloured pencils, your end result is going to end up looking wonky.

If you’re drawing freehand, be sure to use helpful tools like proportional dividers or a grid to better judge distances between lines and areas of the subject being drawn.

4.jpg

For even greater accuracy,  use methods such as tracing. This is especially important when doing pet portraits, where clients expect an accurate painting or drawing of their pet. This is also a massive time-saver and something that I use often. If I freehand my work it can take me up to 8 hours just to get my rough sketch down, depending on complexity. Tracing cuts a massive chunk of time out of this process and allows me to get straight into the nitty gritty.

5

Whether you’re tracing or free-handing, do your rough sketch on a separate piece of paper first, then transfer it using graphite paper onto the surface you’re going to be working on. This keeps the surface you’re working on nice and clean, and free of graphite smears and eraser marks. You can also use this to keep checking your drawing against your original sketch to make sure no features have accidently shifted or gotten larger or smaller as you’re working on them And if you mess up, it’s far easier to start over because you still have your rough sketch to hand!

You can make your own graphite transfer paper at home using tracing paper and a 9B pencil. Simply cover the entire surface of the tracing paper with graphite, and then blend it smooth using a paper blending stump. Apply two to three more layers in the same way, and hey presto! Homemade graphite paper. It lasts a good while and you can reuse the same sheet over and over again. It just needs topping up with graphite again every once in a while.

 

Tip #2: Use reference photos

 

Reference photos are a great way to supplement your artwork, no matter whether you’re drawing illustration work, people or wildlife. As a wildlife artist, I often find myself drawing animals I can’t easily draw from life. I use reference photos to help me understand my subject better. They’re especially important in pet portraits where you need to be as accurate as possible. You can use them to get an idea of a pose or composition, or to help you get a better idea of how fur flows around a subject, for example.

Be careful when selecting reference photos to directly draw from, though! Don’t use photos without seeking permission from the original photographer first or you’ll end up breaking copyright law. There are many websites and groups out there that offer royalty-free photographs that you don’t have to ask permission for in order to use in your artwork. Here are just a few of those websites to get you started:

 

3

Make sure when using reference photos that it’s a good quality photo. You don’t want to use a blurry or badly-lit photo to draw from, because it’s really hard to see details and ultimately it will result in an inaccurate artwork. However, if you’re a little more experienced, you can also incorporate other reference photos to help supplement a bad reference photo.

6

This is a reference photo I took last year of a great crested grebe. It’s really blurry, but I really liked the pose and wanted to make something with it. I brought in other reference photos to help me better understand what the beak and the brown crest on its head look like from close up even though most of that detail was lost in my reference photo.

In a future Art Tips video I’ll give you a more in-depth discussion on how to use and “read” reference photos and incorporate them into your artwork. Keep your eyes peeled for that video by subscribing to my channel!

 

Intermission:

I’ve seen many people (most often not artists or artists lacking in experience) try to argue that tracing your reference photo, or even using a reference photo at all, is cheating, and that there’s no point in “copying” off a photo because the photo itself already exists. I disagree. Please don’t feel guilty using tracing or reference photos for your artwork. Nothing in art is “cheating” –  this is not a video game or a school exam! As artists, we use whatever tools we have available to us to create. Even the old masters used a projection technique called ‘camera obscura’ to allow them to trace images onto their canvas.

As artists it’s our job to take the reference we’re working from and make it look even better than the photos we work off. For the grebe drawing I just showed you, I took a blurry photo and improved it by making a highly detailed drawing from it. Many pet portrait artists, for example, do much the same very frequently – they take often poorly-taken photographs from their clients, and turn them into beautiful fine art portraits of the clients’ pets. At the end of the day, the client wants a beautiful, accurate portrait of their pet. They’re not going to care what techniques were used, as long as the end result is good!

While I’m on this mini-rant, don’t let anyone tell you that your style of art isn’t art. Just because someone doesn’t like a particular style of art or the methods used to get there, it doesn’t mean that they get to decide what is and what isn’t art. Create what you love to create, not what other people tell you to. Okay, so that was kind of off topic. On to the next tip!

Tip #3: Keep your pencils sharp and don’t use a blunt sharpener

7

When using coloured pencils it’s especially important to keep the points of your pencils nice and sharp. By having a sharp pencil, it’s easier to get into all the nooks and crannies of the tooth of the paper and it prevents all the little gaps of the original colour of the paper from showing through. What this means is that you get much better coverage with your pencils, and consequently you won’t need to burnish out – allowing you to fit many more layers in before running out of the tooth of the paper.

While we’re on the topic of pencil sharpeners, let’s talk about breakages. This is more often than not down to the quality of the pencils that you’re using, but your sharpener may also be the partner in crime for breakages too. When a pencil sharpener blade goes dull it is much more likely to cause the core inside your pencils to snap because there is greater friction between the blade and the pencil as it turns in the barrel. You can tell when a pencil sharpener is blunt when the wood from the pencil sharpens off into small flakes rather than one long curl of wood. When it starts doing this, it’s time to bin that sharpener

21

Now, I’m not going to get into the whole manual sharpener vs. electronic sharpener vs. hand-crank sharpener debate. You can waste a whole lot of money on an expensive sharpener that does exactly the same job as a cheap one. Personally, I prefer manual sharpeners, as long as the blade is of good quality and not dull. I use just a cheap, 2-hole sharpener called the KUM Magnesium for sharpening my pencils. This pencil sharpener costs me just £1 and lasts me a good few months. When the blade goes dull, I throw it away and buy a new one. With some brands of sharpener you can even just buy replacement blades instead of having to replace the entire thing, which works out even cheaper still.
When sharpening lots of coloured pencils, this can result in the blade getting clogged with coloured pencil binder. Keep your pencil sharpener in tip-top condition and make it last longer by sharpening it with a graphite pencil every so often. Graphite acts as a lubricant, making it easier for the pencils to swivel around in the hole more smoothly. Doing this keeps the blade sharper for longer, and your pencils sharp as well!

 

Tip #4: Values are more important than hues

 

Before I really get into the crux of this tip, I’ll just quickly go over the essentials of what values and hues are. This explanation is very brief and I strongly recommend looking at more in-depth tutorials relating to colour theory to get a better understanding of this topic if you don’t have one already.

 

Hue explains whether a colour is more red than yellow, or more blue than green, et cetera. What it doesn’t tell you is how close to black or how close to white a colour is – that is where value comes in.

hue diagram

The term “value” explains how light or how dark a colour is – in other words its closeness to black or white. A darker shade of a colour will be closer to black than it will be to white, and vice versa for a light colour.

value diagram

Getting the values in your drawing right is arguably just as important as having an accurate rough sketch. If your drawing doesn’t have enough depth it’s going to end up looking flat, boring and ultimately not realistic or believable. It’s very easy to want to rush straight into getting the details down on your artwork but it’s really important that you get the values of your drawing properly balanced first.  You can very easily create a beautiful piece of artwork that doesn’t have much detail in it, as long as you get all the shadows and highlights in the right place.

One example of my own that comes to mind is my Hyacinth Macaw drawing. In this artwork I ran out of the tooth of the paper too early, and consequently wasn’t able to get it as detailed as I would have liked. But because I had taken the time to get all of my shadows dark enough and my mid-tones and highlights properly balanced before worrying about the details, it meant that I was still able to produce a piece that still looked realistic even without those tiny details.

Another key thing to do is to get the very darkest areas of your drawing in first, and that way it makes it much easier to judge how light or dark you need the rest of the piece to be. Look for the deepest shadows on your reference photo, work on those first. Don’t be afraid of going in really dark with your pencils. Be careful not to burnish too soon though – you still need to be able to adjust and tinker with those areas later on when you’ll be working on finalising and refining your drawing.
A super easy way to better judge the values of your piece and whether or not you need to go darker or lighter in areas is to take a photo of your artwork with your phone, and then turn it greyscale in a photo editor. This completely gets rid of all the colours in your work allowing you to just see the values.

8

It’s much easier to see how light or how dark something is when colour is removed. You can also do this on your reference photos when working off them for the same reason. With a bit of practice you’ll soon easily be able to see where the darkest shadows and brightest highlights in a photo are without needing to do this.


And those are my four beginner tips this time around! I have quite a large list of beginner tips lined up now so keep your eyes peeled for the next instalment of my coloured pencil beginner tips series. If you have any suggestions for what to include in the next video of this series I would love to hear them. Feel free to leave your suggestions in the comments section below!

 

If you’re hungry for more coloured pencil tips and tutorials why don’t check out my other videos? You can also click that subscribe button for more future art tips, tutorials and art product reviews. I also have a Patreon, where you can pledge in order to get extended, fully voiced-over art tutorials, royalty-free reference photos taken by me, signed prints and posters, and occasional bonus content.
Thanks so much for reading. The support in the previous beginner tips video has been unreal and I hope you found this one just as helpful. Until next time!

 

 

Posted on

“Troy” pet portrait, and amur leopard in soft pastels!

"Troy" - 11 x 14inch commission in coloured pencil. Art by Wild Portrait Artist. SOLD.

 

troy finished low res watermarked for fb and insta
“Troy” – 11 x 14inch commission in coloured pencil.

This beautiful boy was one of my Christmas commissions. His endearing puppy-dog-eyes and sweet expression were so much fun to render  It was so refreshing to work with paint thinner again for my coloured pencil art too. I didn’t realise how much I missed it!

This piece was drawn using Caran d’Ache Luminance, Caran d’Ache Pablo, Faber Castell Polychromos and Derwent Drawing coloured pencils. The paper I used was Fabriano Artistico 140lb Hot Pressed Watercolour Paper. I used Daler Rowney odourless paint thinner to blend. Touch-Up Texture and Titanium White powder were used on the chest to pull out the white hairs and highlights on his collar.

My sped-up tutorial is available to watch on YouTube now. The 2 hour version of tutorial will also be available for my Patreon supporters at the $4 tier very soon!

 

I also completed my drawing of an amur leopard in soft pastels last week.

"Determination" - 30 x 40cm portrait of an amur leopard in pastels.
“Determination” – 30 x 40cm portrait of an amur leopard in pastels.

 This piece is now available for sale on my Etsy, so check it out if you’re interested! 

This was such a fun experiment. I may have started off a little wonky on the chin and mouth area, but once I got the hang of the medium it was as natural as riding a bike.

The tools I used to create this piece are Rembrandt soft pastels and Stabilo Carbothello pastel pencils on Clairefontaine pastelmat. Reference photo by Katerina Mirus from Wildlife Reference Photos, used with permission.

Soft pastel is a really enjoyable medium to work in. Expect to see more in this medium from me in the future! I can definitely see myself doing lots of little landscape studies in this medium.

The fully commentated tutorial video for this piece will be available this weekend! I’ll also be reviewing and discussing my thoughts on the brands I used to make this piece too. I might end up splitting it into two videos depending on how long it is. Stay tuned!

 

Last but not least I also started on a new coloured pencil drawing this week.

1-2
“Mythical Beast” – work in progress. Coloured pencils on Fisher 400 sanded paper. I’m about an hour into this drawing so far.

I’m so excited to share this one with you. The concept to this drawing has been swirling around in my head for months now and I finally have a spare moment to start putting it onto paper! 😀 The subject for this drawing is my absolute favourite animal – the okapi. They are an endangered species native to the Congo and their closest relative is the giraffe. When they were first discovered they were so strange-looking that they were thought to be mythical creatures – hence the title of this piece – “Mythical Beast.”

I’m trying to get a sense of mystic surrealism in this portrait so I chose to have the okapi looking up at the aurora borealis – something you would never normally see in the tropical forests! It also gives me the excuse to use lots of pretty blues and greens, muahaha!

I’m using Caran d’Ache Pablos, Caran d’Ache Luminance, Faber Castell Polychromos and Derwent Drawing pencils for this drawing. I’m using powder blender to blend the background, but I’ll also be trying out paint thinner when I get to the okapi itself as I’ve never tried using paint thinner on sanded paper before! I still marvel at how quickly I can get things done with the powder blender. I’m only an hour and ten minutes into the drawing so far, and my background is already almost finished!

I’m also trying out Fisher 400 paper for the first time for this drawing. The tooth of the paper is wonderfully consistent, and in my opinion is superior to UArt paper.

 

This is turning into a long blog post so I’m going to leave it here for now! I’ve got lots more in store for you guys so keep your eyes peeled 🙂

 

Posted on

Christmas Update

"First Snow" Watercolour sketch

This is just a quick update to wish you all a happy holiday season regardless of what you celebrate, and to let you know what I have in store for you guys in the new year. Now that the busiest season of the year is over, I can relax and put my feet up! ;D

 

Last month I uploaded the commentated timelapse tutorial for my hyacinth macaw drawing on youtube – check it out if you haven’t already! Just one thing I would like to mention in addition to what I have said about UArt 800 paper in this video – it turns out that the weird rippling effect I couldn’t get rid of was due to a manufacturing fault from a faulty batch that went out in 2015. I have since got in touch with UArt and they have very kindly offered to send me a replacement. If you have been experiencing similar issues with this particular brand of sanded paper then it is most likely due to that.

Now that my top-secret Christmas commissions are complete I have time again to work on other things. I’ve sketched out a fox from a gorgeous reference photo from wildlifereferencephotos.com. I’ll be trying out the Derwent Inktense sticks and pencils on this piece for a review on my YouTube channel. I love the reference photo I’m using, the fox has such a cheeky sly grin, I just hope I can portray it successfully in my rendition of it. Can’t wait to get painting!

cheeky fox sketch

 

Another project I’ve just started on is an amur leopard in pastels! For this piece I am using Rembrandt soft pastels and Carbothello pastel pencils on Clairefontaine Pastelmat. I’ve never properly used pastels before (the last time I used them was the doodle of a red cardinal I did two years ago). It’s an interesting experience. I have no idea what I’m doing but it’s fun! Right now I’m laying down dark colours to act as the underpainting, and then I’ll draw in the fur in lighter colours on top. This could go terribly wrong but it’s all a learning experience! 😉 I’ve always wanted to work in pastel but have never taken the plunge properly before now. We all have to start somewhere!

amur leopard work in progress in soft pastels

That’s about it for now. I’ll have tutorials/product reviews for both of the above coming in January/February, as well as a fully voiced tutorial for one of my christmas commissions in coloured pencil, so stay tuned! See you all in the New Year!

 

 

Posted on

Finished cheetah drawing and tutorial

"Relaxed Afternoon" 42 x 29.7cm coloured pencil drawing on UArt 600 Sanded paper using powder blender. Own ref photo used. Art by Wild Portrait Artist. Available for sale.

Whew! It’s finished! Up till now the only things I had drawn using the powder blender were invertebrates, which are generally very shiny and easy to shade. I wanted to see how easy or difficult it would be to draw fur using the colored pencil painting kit, so I decided to draw this!

I discovered that it was so easy to draw in light hairs over a darker base colour, which made drawing fur miles easier! I used Uart 600 paper for this piece, instead of the Uart 800 paper I used in previous pieces, so it had a little more tooth. I found I could layer a lot more before running out of tooth, however the tradeoff for this was that I had difficulty in getting fine details and thin pencil lines. It was a fun drawing! It took me around 20 hours in total.

"Relaxed Afternoon" 42 x 29.7cm coloured pencil drawing on UArt 600 Sanded paper using powder blender. Own ref photo used.
“Relaxed Afternoon” 42 x 29.7cm coloured pencil drawing on UArt 600 Sanded paper using powder blender. Own ref photo used.

 

You can watch my commentated tutorial on how I created this drawing here:


Last but not least I just started working on my next graphite drawing! This time I’ll be drawing my grumpy old ragdoll, Suki this is the second in a pair of portraits, matching the one I did last year of Toto. I’ll be using Mars Lumograph pencils for this portrait for a product review video, and will let you know what I think of them next week! 🙂

14390819_866539140146556_1019651766507989343_n

Posted on

How to use fixative sprays + new cheetah drawing!

cheetah colored pencil drawing work in progress using uart 600 grain paper and colored pencil powder blender

In this week’s Art Tips video I show you how to spray your artwork with fixative spray the right way!

 

Last week I started a new coloured pencil drawing using powder blender! I’m using my own reference photo of a cheetah from Chester Zoo for this one. This time I’m using UArt 600-grain paper and seeing how it compares to the 800-grain that I’ve been using in previous drawings. Really excited to be back to drawing fur again!

14212639_853234421477028_5891988353230965397_n

On Friday I’ll be uploading a commentated tutorial to Youtube on how I drew my jumping spider, so stay tuned!

Posted on

Powder Blender tutorial!

"At the Edge" - 29 x 22cm, coloured pencil on UArt 800-grain paper. Made using the Colored Pencil Painting Kit. Art by Wild Portrait Artist. Available for sale.

Phew! A lot of updates this week. 3 completed full-blown drawings and two videos within one week is probably my best ever rate of production, though I should probably sleep at some point! 😂

Earlier on in the week I recorded an in-depth video review of the full coloured pencil painting kit  in which I discuss my opinions and my experiences with the powder blender and the rest of the Painting Kit range! If you have any interest in the powder blender and the rest of the kit, please do check it out! Also, if you live in the UK, Jacksonsart will be getting it in stock by the end of September! 😀

"The Alien" - 29 x 22cm, colored pencil on UArt 800-grain paper. Created using brushandpencil Powder Blender and Textured Fixative by Alyona Nickelsen
“The Alien” – 29 x 22cm, colored pencil on UArt 800-grain paper. Created using brushandpencil Powder Blender and Textured Fixative.

This is the drawing I made using the powder blender for my review. This piece only took me 6 hours!!! That is SUPER fast considering most pieces of this size, without the background, can take me upwards of 12+ hours usually! I still can’t believe how quickly I flew through this piece! I also made a commentated video tutorial for this drawing too which you can see below, which shows you just how easy the powder blender is to use with coloured pencil!

 

 

And last but not least, this drawing was fresh off the easel last night. Again, created with the Colored Pencil Painting Kit by Brush and Pencil. I love jumping spiders, they are such inquisitive little guys!  The video tutorial of me drawing this little guy will be out on Friday next week! Reference photo used from Roverhate on Pixabay.

 

"At the Edge" - 29 x 22cm, coloured pencil on UArt 800-grain paper. Made using the Colored Pencil Painting Kit.
“At the Edge” – 29 x 22cm, coloured pencil on UArt 800-grain paper. Made using the Colored Pencil Painting Kit.

That’s about it for this week! Phew! I think I need to lie down and sleep now! Stay tuned next week as Monday’s Art Tips video will be a mini-tutorial on how to spray fixative onto your drawings properly, and on Friday I’ll be posting the fully-commentated tutorial of my jumping spider drawing!

Adios, amigos!

Posted on

Review: Colored Pencil Painting Kit

Today’s video is an in-depth review of the full Colored Pencil Painting Kit by Brush and Pencil, including my thoughts and experiences with the Powder Blender!

Stay tuned for tomorrow when I will be bringing you the second part of this video series – a tutorial on how to use the powder blender in your coloured pencil work.

Posted on

New Drawing and Art Tips Video!

pearl cat sphinx coloured pencil portrait colored pencil drawing art commission pet portrait

pearl cat sphinx coloured pencil portrait colored pencil drawing art commission pet portrait

 

Here’s a little close-up of the beginnings of my latest coloured pencil commission. This is Pearl, a beautiful sphinx with a genetic mutation that caused her to grow beautifully wooly, soft fur.

My favourite part is getting the base layers of pencil down and blending before adding detail and hair over the top ❤  (who am I kidding, it’s all my favourite part!)

I also uploaded a new Art Tips video today! In this videoI show you how to use touch-up texture and titanium white powder by brushandpencil.com to create archival white highlights on your coloured pencil artwork.

 

 

 

Posted on

Published in Colored Pencil Magazine!

I am very excited to announce that you can read my article, “Is Tracing Cheating?” in the August 2016 issue of Colored Pencil Magazine! You can purchase a digital or physical copy of the magazine here: www.coloredpencilmag.com/issues

cpm1608_72preview.jpg